Tag Archives: tips

4.0.1: The Mindset

You can have the gear, you can have the spec, but with it all, you have nothing if you don’t have the mindset to heal in this patch. Adapting your previous healadin frame of mind is what surviving 4.0.1 is all about.

In a span of less than 24 hours, everything you ever knew about paladin healing changed. We’ve got buttons to push, spells that do the same thing at different speeds and costs, fun spell effects (okay, just one of these), and they even took the bubble hearth away.

So how do we fix this?

First, you have to acknowledge that there is no more Holy Light/Flash of Light spec. Neither one of these spells are what you want to find yourself spamming. Holy Light has been whacked for more than half of what it was capable of in Wrath and Flash of Light, while still decent in output, is horrible in the mana department. What may or may not have been a staple in your previous rotations, Holy Shock is now the go to, the use every CD, the important heal. The only way to get into the frame of mind is for you to work on it. I can’t hypnotize you, I can’t say anything that will make it all better, I can only tell you I am here too and hand you a tissue as I weep for my place on top of the healing charts.

Fix your keybindings, macros, add-ons, whatever it is you use, fix it. If you find yourself FoL spamming and drained of that precious blue bar, or even the yellow runic bar!, move it, re-bind it. Whether you are trying to cast the wrong spell or the right spell, you may find your fingers moving to their old beat so it can help to utilize this when training yourself to use these new spells.

Don’t shy away from add-ons. I am a big supporter of not using add-ons. But if you need help watching for HS every CD, find an add-on to help. If you need a Beacon Timer because you’re not solely on tanks, find one.

Be familiar with the base output of each spell against its mana cost. This is a good thing to know before going in blind to a heroic or raid. Train yourself to know how much healing really comes from HS/WoG or Divine Light and Flash of Light. And don’t forget Light of Dawn. Its capability to hit that many people for a moderate amount is something you don’t want to forget. When you are familiar and comfortable with what each spell is capable of YOU ARE CONFIDENT! And that is the key factor in this whole situation.

Right now, I haven’t seen a person use the same spec as someone else. Granted, I haven’t inspected every healadin blogger nor every healadin on my server, but every single one of us…we’re just trying to find our groove…our place in the world now. The Holy build has access to a lot of utility spells but without all of our talent points available, we have to find what works best now as we adapt and in time, we will grow to that cookie cutter spec, someday we may have it, maybe we won’t.

But for now,  don’t give up. Don’t think that crazy mage dps (*cough*) is looking better and better, don’t think that ret has more fun, don’t think these things! They only hurt the frame of mind you’re trying to fix. It isn’t a same spell spamfest (though it might be a spamfest of sorts, this is yet to be determined), it takes thought and awareness!

Good luck, healadins friends.

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For the Children!

Yes, it is that time of year again when Children’s Week has finally rolled around. This holiday stirs up a lot of emotions for a lot of people. From adopted children to the PVP haters, this holiday has something in store to kick up the heat for everyone. This post turned out to be a mini-guide to the School of Hard Knocks, while I am not sure how that happened, I still encourage you to check out Wowhead’s full out guide to the holiday as well!

Reflecting back on the Brewfest changes a couple patches ago, you know when they removed Strange Brew from the meta, makes me wonder why exactly they haven’t removed School of Hard Knocks from this meta. I don’t intend to rant or rave about as there is enough of that already, but I still dislike this intently.

This achievement is not for the feint hearted or for those who never intended to PVP. This achievement not only forces you to enter battlegrounds but requires you to be tactical. Unlike the Merrymaker achievement, With a Little Helper from my Friends, you have to perform actual duties and roles in the battleground. For some, myself included, this is a great difficulty because these objectives are things that I usually have trouble with in general, let alone my achievement depending on it.

Return a Fallen Flag in Warsong Gulch

This doesn’t seem difficult in any sense, but even in a normal bg week you have 3-4 defenders around an EFC (enemy flag carrier), all clicking their hearts out to get that flag return. It is possible, to see some altruism in the flag returns when no other enemies are around to share the returns for this achievement, but this opportunity may be far and few in between.

If you are having difficulty with this achievement and are looking to make an offensive move check the map for typical EFC locations.

Typical EFC Locations

While waiting for one flag to drop, flag carriers tend to hide on the roof of their respective bases, but be careful, they usually have defense (either a healer or DPS). Some flag carriers feel they are invincible and run around mid-field in combat, showing off their illustrious battle-harden skills. Mid-field is also a good place for a 360 look on where the flag carrier is if they just picked up. Listen and utilize /bg chat to talk to your teammates about where the EFC is and the party surrounding them.

Assault a Flag in Arathi Basin

This is not too difficult. Capping the farm for the Horde/stables for the Alliance is relatively easy with no competition other than your fellow allies trying to get cap credit. If you see a plain gray flag, it has yet to be assaulted and is free game. If the flag has a gray, enemy logo, it has been assaulted and you must either defend (which doesn’t count for this achievement) or wait to assault it once they have claimed it.

If your PVP skills aren’t what they “should” be, you’re riding solo, or in general want to avoid confrontation, up your view distance to see the enemies at any given base. This will help you decided whether that flag is a viable target or if you should ride out to another base. An important fact to note, when capping a flag, the channel is interruptable and the person who tagged it first will gain the credit. However, just because someone is going for the credit, don’t bail out, they may get interrupted, leaving you with a completed objective!

Capture the Flag in Eye of the Storm

This is also a relatively easy achievement. Eye of the Storm is kind of a mesh up between WSG/AB. You have the concept of capturing the flag from mid-field but you must also assaultthe bases and hold the forts for resource points. However, to cap the base you must just be present, there is no base assaulting flag thing. Fights at mid-field for the flag go 2 ways. There is no one there or EVERYONE is there it seems. By turning your view distance up you can monitor the population to know the appropriate and easiest moment to grab the flag.

Flag at mount in mid-field**

When carrying the flag as a paladin, don’t bubble! You will drop it. Don’t mount. Rogues can sprint, mages can blink, druids can cat (maybe even travel form?), etc. Once you have the flag cross/back-track the bridge and bee-line for the base. All you have to do is run over the flag mount and get the credit. On a side note, Eye of the Storm is my favorite!

Assault a tower in Alterac Valley

Places to Assault

Warning: Your hair may experience a bald spot as you pull it out in frustration.

A small tip, as I am not skilled in much of this battleground (most of my expereince entails simply keeping people alive while following them around), is this: you may want to do this with a companion so that one can take the NPC aggro, while the other assaults the flag for credit. I don’t have much in the way to offer about strategy here other than “Ride out, young fighter! Ride as fast as you can to the Stonehearth Bunker with your companion!” That is in a nutshell how I, alongside my boyfriend, got this objective 4 times.

Once all of these objectives are complete, the achievement will finally be earned and well deserved!

There are five other achievements that you will need to work on for the meta but they are fun and lively! No farming and only one instance required! If this is your first Children’s Week, please note that you will not be getting Veteran Nanny any time soon but it is not part of the meta either!

There are three orphans you have the chance to take care of for the reward of three different mini-pets, an orc/human in Azeroth, Blood Elf/Draeni in Outlands, and Wolvar/Oracle in Northrend! Classic and fun, babysitting Baby Salandria is AMAZING. In an RP glory, she is a baby Tar and that is just awesome.

So go out and enjoy the holiday, drown your PVP sorrows, and have a baby! But remember this holiday is a short one and is over (conveniently) on Mother’s Day!

**Image found on thottbot but is self hosted.

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Filed under Achievements, Holidays

Recycle A Post: Gylph Analysis

Since the release of 4.0.1, this information is outdated and you can find the current information by clicking here.

In light of Earth Day, Zelmaru has encouraged us to Recycle A Post. I have chosen my glyph analysis. It wasn’t a playful article but was one of my first informational posts for the holy paladin and I got some great tips on how to organize it. I also have received more insight on the use of the glyphs, so I wanted to rework these a little bit based on my expanded noggin! I hope this turns out better than the first one! I will also highlight (in green for Earth Day!) the changes that have been made for those who may have already read the original!

*******

The glyphs I use personally will be marked with **. I certainly hope that this helps people who are having a hard time making the glyph decision.

Majors

Glyph of Holy Light**: This glyph turns your biggest heal (Holy Light) into an Area-of-Effect (AOE) heal. I love this glyph. We are the only healing class that doesn’t have one and therefore are designed as tank/bomb healers (even though raid healing is possible). The glyph heals friendly targets within 8 yards for 10% of the holy light effect. It isn’t a lot but can make topping off the party while healing the tank a cinch. Furthermore, depending on your spec, should you be a HL spammer, this glyph is a must have.  Further analysis results in this glyph being highly valuable for the Valithria Dreamwalker fight. By using the Beacon on the boss, healing others, she also receives splash healing. This is highly recommended for all degrees of PVE healadins.

Glyph of Holy Shock: Coming back to this glyph I have had a change in thought. Holy Shock is a  part of my healing rotation, occasionally it can land for almost 11k with a critical effect. However, it isn’t so integral that 1 second makes much of a difference for my style; it can for others. It can also be paired well with the Libram of Binding Light. This is only recommended for healers who find themselves moving a lot, are dependent on Holy Shock, and have the libram.

Glyph of Flash of Light**: With this glyph your Flash of Light spell has an additional 5% critical strike rating. I no longer stand to feel this is a universal must-have. Today, so many paladins have 30k+ mana pools that mana effieciency doesn’t seem to be a problem, therefore limiting them to the spam of the Holy Light. With that in consideration, Flash of Light is no longer used making this a wasted glyph for some. However, for the PVP healadin, it is all but required as FoL is a central (if not only) focus.

Glyph of Seal of Light**: One of the paladin’s defining abilities is seals+judgements. As a holy paladin, judging to proc the talent Judgements of the Pure is a must! When it increases your spell haste by 15%, why wouldn’t you? Therefore, it is important to use an appropriate seal for healing. This glyph adds an extra 5% healing effect to any spell that you cast; it also has an appropriate counterpart (Glyph of Seal of Wisdom) that reduces mana costs of all spells by 5%. Depending on your heal style and your mana conservation abilities, either one of these glyphs should be required. You are already using a seal…why not get a buff from it? In addition, if you are a constant SoW user, I have been told that switching to glyphed SoL is extremely helpful in the Valithria Dreamwalker fight.

Glyph of Judgement: I know I said that judging as a healadin is important for the haste buff, but that doesn’t mean you need a damage buff to how much damage you are doing with a judgement. It isn’t your job as the healer to do the damage.

Glyph of Cleansing: Without this glyph, Cleanse costs 6% base mana to cast each time; the glyph reduces this by 20%. To show you a little math, I have 30,034 mana but I only have (last I looked) 7449 base mana. It takes (at 6% a cast) 447 mana to cast Cleanse. With the glyph it would take 358. In the grand scheme of things, it is about 1% of my total mana to cleanse. In raids, I run with many other healers who can abolish disease, cleanse, cleanse spirit, decurse, etc. The sole burden of cleansing (or even fights that don’t require cleansing), does not rest on me so much that I should worry about <100 mana cost. ((I am pretty fond of this in-depth analysis!))

Beacon of Light: Even though I do not use this glyph, I would say that it is still useful. A standard cast of Beacon of Light lasts 60 seconds. This glyph adds 30 seconds increasing the buff to a minute and a half. If you find yourself forgetful to re-cast Beacon, I strongly suggest this. However, as it does nothing else and you find you have excellent buff management ((see my addon post for help with Beacon timing in NeedtoKnow)), you may find other glyphs more suitable.

Glyph of Divine Plea: I know that as a holy paladin, you are probably popping Divine Plea every cooldown. But that doesn’t mean this glyph is for you. The reduced damage effect makes this a tank oriented glyph. I have also recently been asked about the efficiency/need to use Divine Plea; is it worth it as a healer? Of course, mana conservation is needed at all levels of healing. As a healer, the glyph is worthless, but try using Divine Plea + Avenging Wrath; this will help mitigate some healing percentage loss. Also, to avoid using this ability as much, utilize Divine Illumination to the best of your cooldown ability!

Glyph of Divinity: Lay on Hands gives the target burst health based on the casting paladin’s health and it also “…restores 1950 mana”. The glyph applies the same mana gain to you as it does the target. 1950 mana is barely over the cost of Holy Light. This glyph may also encourage you to use LoH as a mana regen ability which could later prove to cause a lot of trouble.  There are worse ones to have, but there are significantly better as well.

Minors

Glyph of Blessing of Wisdom**: This increases the buff timer of BoW on yourself making it 30 minutes. This is considerably helpful when running with another paladin who wants Blessing of Might. How? If you cast Greater Blessing of Might on the two of you, you can replace your own with a standard Blessing of Wisdom and still have a 30-minute buff. They can cast Blessing of Kings and everyone is happy. If you are leveling Holy and find your mana bringing a lot of downtime but you buff yourself with Kings, try using this and save some Symbols of Kings at the same time. I personally find this considerably handy as I begin to run with fewer paladins.

Glyph of Blessing of Kings**: Blessing of Kings is the most universal buff we have and unlike BoW, this glyph reduces the mana costs of BoK by 50%. The lowered mana cost can make buffing during a wipe recovery go considerably quicker. There aren’t many minor glyphs to choose from and even though you don’t get much from this, I still recommend it. In addition, when running with druids and making use of the battle resurrections, rebuffing the risen with the least amount of mana use is important. This is highly valuable for those in a progressive raiding guild.

Glyph of the Wise: “Reduces the mana cost of your Seal of Wisdom by 50%”. Even if you had to cast this in combat, it is a onetime deal and you have the buff though you usually buff before combat when you can regain your mana with water. Furthermore, if you don’t even use Seal of Wisdom, this is a useless glyph for you. The argument could be made that one switches from Seal of Light to Seal of Wisdom often, which is unnecessary. You should use the seal that you are glyphed to buff and alternate judgements rather than seals.

Glyph of Lay on Hands**: Get it. Don’t think twice about it. Unlike a reduced Holy Shock CD (1-sec, see above); 5 minutes on your Lay on Hands could make or break a fight. This glyph paired with the talent Improved Lay on Hands reduces the cooldown to 11 minutes.

Glyph of Sense Undead: If you want to waste a glyph slot, don’t do it with this. This could be a helpful leveling glyph while you are in Icecrown but it is not viable for end-game content as it is a damage buff to undead. Okay, I still don’t recommend it but I am going to change my stance that it is worthless. I still put my heart in soul into the 3 that I have but I am also a miner by trade. I NEVER use my Sense Undead ability. But if you do because you can track nothing else, it is okay to have this glyph. I put stock into using the others even if you don’t have mana concerns and especially if you have a higher damage output off-spec but if you want it, go for it.

When you are making the decision to glyph your holy paladin you should always have your play style in consideration. Ask yourself: “What kind of healer am I?” “How is my mana conservation and regen?” “What spells and abilities do I use the most?”  These questions will help you eliminate some of the choices making it an easier decision.

Reworking most of these, I have changed my opinion on some of them but stand strong and steadfast in the use of most of them. I still believe that you need to consider your personal playing style when trying to choose as well as your ability to manage cool-downs and mana.

The original post was written in February so I feel I have grown in writing, in healing, in everything and I hope this republishing helps those that still face this decision!

PS. Feel free to comment and let me know if you agree or disagree.

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Filed under Healing Tips, Holy Paladin, Paladin Guides

Elder Tarinae’s Tips

I’m not going to think of a witty intro. I have been sitting here for 2 hours looking at a blank screen and have tried for 3 days to have the inspiration of how to write this and what to write about. Currently in-game the Lunar Festival is going on in game and the holiday requires you to literally travel across Azeroth to honor Elders. Khi over at Tree Burglar had a great idea for the “Elder” players to create a post for those who are new to the game! I have thought long and hard about what to do. At some point I will do a leveling guild and/or tips for paladins but I don’t want that for this. I want this to be unique. I want this to help ANYONE who tries to read it; bits on paladin talents won’t help that warlock hunting mage that strolls through there. So I am going universal…multi-functional even!

Things Everyone Should Know

  1. When trading down Emblems, Shift+Click to trade a mass quantity (I was given this direction in life after having done 60 individual trades from conquest to heroism.)
  2. You should use gear for the stats it provides (i.e. Intellect/Spirit) and not the Damage of a weapon or the armor numbers. (For those priests who want 2 armor points and agi/stam over what they have with int/spirit).
  3. No class can use every weapon. (Warriors come close but cannot use wands).
  4. Class quests can be very important! (They tend to reward necessary spells like Paladin’s Redemption, or Berserker stance!)
  5. You should choose one talent specialization and max it out instead of throwing your points around randomly. (Could you imagine a Holy Paladin without Beacon? I think not.)
  6. There is a difference between PVE, PVP, and leveling talents. You do not need to reduce damage taken or increase output as an end-game healer.
  7. PVE = Player-versus-Environment, PVP = Player-versus-Player, DPS = Damage Per Second, WTB = Want to Buy, WTS = Want to Sell, PST = Please send Tell
  8. Melee Hit Rating is at 8% or 263. Spell Hit Rating is 17%. Hit percentages do not reflect talents or presences like the Draeni racial so you must add that manually.
  9. If you are a retribution paladin or warrior, do not gem for Attack Power. You get more attack power from strength. Ret pallies receive 2.4 points of attack power/1 STR.
  10. Where you quest, the spec you chose, the gear you wear, and the rotation you use are in the end up to you. You pay to play. There is no wrong way or right way to play but there are highly suggested ways to play if you want the most output/results.

I attempted to make this a list of life-lessons that I have learned throughout my experience. Some are trivial but as a new player I didn’t know acronyms, half the time I still don’t know what classes can you what weapons. I also wanted to include some end-game tips I have been sharing recently. It is my goal that this helps anyone and everyone that reads it. Being a veteran (Elder Tarinae) for going on three years, I am glad to have shared my wisdom with you and leave you with one parting tip:

Just because a socket is prismatic, does not mean the gem has to be; any color will match.

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Add-on Analysis: NeedtoKnow

I am not a fan of running a lot of add-ons. I recently had to downgrade my video card for fan issues and have more lag than ever. I lost about 30 fps on average and have a new found appreciation for running with few add-ons. There are a few that I have decided however, that I cannot LIVE without. NeedtoKnow is one of them. This is a buff timer add-on with a multitude of utilizations.

As a holy paladin, we have access to a lot of timers and add-ons that can watch things like Beacon of Light, Sacred Shield, etc. There is BoLT (Beacon of Light Timer), CLCBPT (it is recommended in this post at wow.com), PallyPower, Power Auras, and tons more! Nonetheless, I wouldn’t trade NeedtoKnow for any of them. The sheer utilization of the addon outside of the Paladin class makes it useful to have unlike some of the paladin-specific. I will analyze the use of the addon in several ways; ways that I have implemented it for Paladins (holy and ret), Mages, Priests, and a recommendation I have been given for Warlocks. Maybe you will be amazed, maybe you won’t but this add-on is one of my lifelines.

Holy Paladin

  • Excellent for Beacon of Light: Setting the tank as your focus, you can adjust the buff bar to monitor your focus target and regardless of whether you alter your target, NeedtoKnow is displaying a timer for your Beacon (your focus target). This allows you to heal around if needed, and is a considerable help in 5-man healing.
  • Sacred Shield: As the bars are in groupings, you can have your Beacon of Light timer together with your Sacred Shield timer. It allows you to know that your shield is about to fall off and gives you the chance to sync up the re-cast with your BoL timer.

Retribution Paladin

  • Art of War: This is a talent that you spec into that will allow the ability to proc when you critically hit with melee. The ability allows your next Flash of Light or Exorcism be an instant cast. This is a great proc to take advantage of for your DPS output, or when questing can be a difference between life or death. Without constantly focusing on your buff bar, you can set NeedtoKnow to monitor yourself and the bar will appear when the ability is up. Setting the bar to a large size and in a bright color, it is hard to miss that you have it at your disposal.
  • Sacred Shield: As a questing ret pally, it helps to use the shield always and setting it differently to monitor yourself, this is an efficient timer for you as well.
  • Judgement: While I strongly encourage you to have Judgements as a major part in your rotation, you can set a target monitor to know that your judgement debuff on the mob has fallen off and you need to re-cast.

Arcane Mages

  • Missile Barrage: Much like Art of War for a Paladin, Missile Barrage is a proc ability that you talent into near the bottom of the tree. Very similar to what I described above, setting this to monitor yourself will tell you when the ability has procced and it is efficient for you to cast Arcane Missiles.
  • Arcane Power: A cooldown that an Arc Mage has at their disposal, tracking this allows you to watch the timer on the buff and to know when it is fading away. It isn’t significant to track this but it can help when you are monitoring all your buffs for maximum output.
  • Icy Veins: When you use this to quicken your Evocation, watching the timer on this buff is significant to timing it right with your channeling. You can also, should you be the raid leader, sync Bloodlust/Heroism at the last few seconds of Icy Veins to maximize your output for the longest amount of possible time.
  • Focus Magic: If you have a couple casters in your group and you wonder who to put it on, monitoring YOUR focus magic buff will tell you how much your target player is striking critically, allowing you to change your target should you feel someone else has a higher percentage rating for Critical Strike Rating.

Frost Mages

  • Fireball!: If you have the talent Brain Freeze, it procs the ability for you to instant cast your Fireball spell. This as of 3.3.3 will also cost no mana under the “Fireball!” buff. Like all other self-monitoring buff effects, this is great to know when to cast that otherwise-forever-long-cast of a Fireball.

Holy/Disc Priests

  • Renew: When you are throwing this around, you can have it set to monitor your target. This is great for raid healing utilization. Regardless of who you are targeting, this add-on will let you know the status (or existence) of their Renew. If you are tank healing, it is also a great Focus target feature to ensure your tank always has this HOT.
  • Power Word: Shield: Much like a paladin, this is great for ensuring your shield is available on a target. It does not account for Weakened Soul, but your casting ability is grayed out when a target is effected by the debuff.

Warlock

  • Immolate: This was a use that was revealed to me by Cynwise over at Cynwise’s Battlefield Manual. You can use NeedtoKnow to also monitor debuffs put onto your target. This is significantly helpful in raids where boss fights can last several minutes. You can set the bars to monitor any and all debuffs on the target; I only have Immolate up in the picture but it does work for curses, Corruption, etc.

While I do not know how, I know this add-on can be used by rogues as well. The add-on was recommended to me by a rogue who was making use of it at the time.

One of the other pluses to this add-on is that it is fully customizable. The default setting for the add-on will give you 1 group of 3 bars. It is set to monitor the player and buffs. In the Interface window for add-ons, you can alter the number of bars per group (The Arcane Mage image above has 4 bars in a group), you can add groups, change bar patterns, etc. You can customize each bar color, the way time is displayed (i.e. 2m, 1:58, 1:58:01), you can do a variety of unit monitoring including player, focus, target, target of target, etc. With patch 3.3.0, this add-on recieved a hefty overhaul allowing all of the extra customization. It was great before, but it is spectacular now.

It has become a lifeline for me for several of my characters. I find sometimes I get a little lost healing without it, and that is kind of sad, but serves to prove how useful NeedtoKnow is. You can get your own download of Needtoknow over at Curse or by clicking here.

PS. If you find that you have the add-on and have it customized to your liking but it isn’t timing, be sure to enable it and toggle out of customize-view by using the command /ntk or /needtoknow.

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Filed under Add-On, General Warcraft, Holy Paladin

Cheers & Jeers: Glyph Analysis

I feel like offering an analysis of holy glyphs. I’ve heard of some different choices other than the ones I use recently and thought I would take a look at what they each bring to the table or why they should be kicked under the table. The glyphs I use personally will be marked with **. I certainly hope that this helps people who are having a hard time making the glyph decision.

Cheers: Glyph of Holy Light** (Ma): This glyph turns your biggest heal (Holy Light)into an Area-of-Effect (AOE) heal. I love this glyph. We are the only healing class that doesn’t have one and therefore are designed as tank/bomb healers. The glyph heals friendly targets within 8 yards for 10% of the holy light effect. It isn’t a lot but can make topping off the party while healing the tank a cinch. Furthermore, depending on your spec, should you be a HL spammer, this glyph is a must have.  ((In my own world, I feel more gratified seeing all the green all over the screen too hehe))

Jeers: Glyph of Holy Shock (Ma): Ugh. This is a glyph better spent with something else; please don’t take a spot up with it. What does it do? It reduces the cooldown of your Holy Shock by 1 second. ONE SECOND! I do not feel the need to elaborate that in all my healing experience I have never seen an occurrence where Holy Shock would have been a saving grace had it been ready 1 second faster. Never.  What can you do should you need an “oh-shit-button” and holy shock is down? Lay on Hands.

Cheers: Glyph of Flash of Light** (Ma): This glyph is a universal must have.  With this glyph your Flash of Light spell has an additional 5% critical strike rating. This is extremely useful in PVP where your main ability if FoL but it is also useful in all areas of PvE (raiding, instancing, and questing).

Cheers: Glyph of Seal of Light** (Ma): One of the paladin’s defining abilities is seals+judgements. As a holy paladin, judging to proc the talent Judgements of the Pure is a must! When it increases your spell haste by 15%, why wouldn’t you? Therefore, it is important to use an appropriate seal for healing. This glyph adds an extra 5% healing effect to any spell that you cast; it also has an appropriate counterpart (Glyph of Seal of Wisdom) that reduces mana costs of all spells by 5%. Depending on your heal style and your mana conservation abilities, either one of these glyphs should be required. You are already using a seal…why not get a buff from it?

Jeers: Glyph of Sense Undead (Mi): If you want to waste a glyph slot, don’t do it with this.  This could be a helpful leveling glyph while you are in Icecrown but it is not viable for end-game content as it is a damage buff to undead.  ((Yes, I’ve seen some raiding healadins use it.))

Cheers: Glyph of Blessing of Wisdom** (Mi): This increases the buff timer of BoW on yourself making it 30 minutes. This is considerably helpful when running with another paladin who wants Blessing of Might. How? If you cast Greater Blessing of Might on the two of you, you can replace your own with a standard Blessing of Wisdom and still have a 30-minute buff. They can cast Blessing of Kings and everyone is happy. If you are leveling Holy and find your mana bringing a lot of downtime but you buff yourself with Kings, try using this and save some Symbols of Kings at the same time.

Cheers: Glyph of Blessing of Kings** (Mi): Blessing of Kings is the most universal buff we have and unlike BoW, this glyph reduces the mana costs of BoK by 50%. The lowered mana cost can make buffing during a wipe recovery go considerably quicker. There aren’t many minor glyphs to choose from and even though you don’t get much from this, I still recommend it.

Jeers: Glyph of the Wise (Mi): “Reduces the mana cost of your Seal of Wisdom by 50%”. Even if you had to cast this in combat, it is a onetime deal and you have the buff though you usually buff before combat when you can regain your mana with water. Furthermore, if you don’t even use Seal of Wisdom, this is a useless glyph for you. The argument could be made that one switches from Seal of Light to Seal of Wisdom often, which is unnecessary. You should use the seal that you are glyphed to buff and alternate judgements rather than seals.

Cheers: Glyph of Lay on Hands** (Mi): Get it. Don’t think twice about it. Unlike a reduced Holy Shock CD (1-sec, see above); 5 minutes on your Lay on Hands could make or break a fight. This glyph paired with the talent Improved Lay on Hands reduces the cooldown to 11 minutes.

Jeers: Glyph of Judgement (Ma): I know I said that judging as a healadin is important for the haste buff, but that doesn’t mean you need a damage buff to how much damage you are doing with a judgement. It isn’t your job as the healer to do the damage.

Jeers: Glyph of Cleansing (Ma): Without this glyph, Cleanse costs 6% base mana to cast each time; the glyph reduces this by 20%. To show you a little math, I have 30,034 mana but I only have (last I looked) 7449 base mana. It takes (at 6% a cast) 447 mana to cast Cleanse. With the glyph it would take 358. In the grand scheme of things, it is about 1% of my total mana to cleanse. In raids, I run with many other healers who can abolish disease, cleanse, cleanse spirit, decurse, etc. The sole burden of cleansing (or even fights that don’t require cleansing), does not rest on me so much that I should worry about <100 mana cost.

Cheers: Beacon of Light (Ma): Even though I do not use this glyph, I would say that it is still useful. A standard cast of Beacon of Light lasts 60 seconds. This glyph adds 30 seconds increasing the buff to a minute and a half. If you find yourself forgetful to re-cast Beacon, I strongly suggest this. However, as it does nothing else and you find you have excellent buff management ((the add-on NeedtoKnow is GREAT for watching your Beacon timer with focus targets)), you may find other glyphs more suitable.

Jeers: Glyph of Divine Plea (Ma): I know that as a holy paladin, you are probably popping Divine Plea every cooldown. But that doesn’t mean this glyph is for you. The reduced damage effect makes this a tank oriented glyph.

Jeers: Glyph of Divinity (Ma): Lay on Hands gives the target burst health based on the casting paladin’s health and it also “…restores 1950 mana”. The glyph applies the same mana gain to you as it does the target. 1950 mana is barely over the cost of Holy Light. This glyph may also encourage you to use LoH as a mana regen ability which could later prove to cause a lot of trouble.  There are worse ones to have, but there are significantly better as well.

Taking on this analysis, I don’t think I realized just how many glyphs a holy paladin may consider using regardless of how bad some of them may be. When you are making the decision to glyph your holy paladin you should always have your play style in consideration. Ask yourself: “What kind of healer am I?” “How is my mana conservation and regen?” “What spells and abilities do I use the most?”  These questions will help you eliminate some of the choices making it an easier decision. Good luck.

PS. Feel free to comment and let me know if you agree or disagree.

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Filed under Holy Paladin, Paladin Guides

Beacon Who?

A Healadin’s Guide to Beacon of Light

As a Holy Paladin, you possess several defining spells and abilities that make you a strong healing force.  Many of the healing abilities are shared among all specs, but holy has one attribute that sets them apart: Beacon of Light.  In my journeys as a healing paladin, I have found that there are several different tactics in the use of Beacon and fights that require a particular use for the staple ability.

It is first important to understand what Beacon of Light actually does and why it is one of the most important spells in the holy paladin’s arsenal.  The in-game tooltip explains the spell effect as, “The target becomes a Beacon of Light to all members of your party or raid within a 60 yard radius.  Any heals you cast on party or raid members will also heal the Beacon for 100% of the amount healed.  Only one target can be the Beacon of Light at a time. Lasts 1 [minute].”  How does this translate to laymen’s terms? Simple; every, single point of healing done to one target also heals the Beacon for the same amount.  This ability also counts over-healing towards the beacon target as well.

This may not sound very flashy but this spell recently received an overhaul.  Prior to patch 3.2, Beacon of Light would only apply the effective healing done on a target.  The effective healing being only what is counted to take the target to full health, while anything over that is counted as over-healing. When the Beacon of Light went from effective to over-healing, holy paladins could see their Beacon targets healed for several thousand more than what was previously thought of as standard.

This change made a significant difference in solo healing instances and tank healing raid bosses.  As a paladin, finding the most comfortable way for you to use your Beacon is very important. Whether you find it helpful to Beacon the main tank, off-tank, or even yourself, there are certain fights that you may find beneficial to use it in a particular way. Knowing these will also be significantly helpful for the budding healer.

Garfrost in Pit of Saron 5-Man

Healing Garfrost the first time can prove to be quite a complication. There is a heavy combination of DPS always breaking line-of-sight and the tank running out of range to the forge.  As a paladin healer, should you have any doubts, need to Beacon the tank in this fight.  When he runs to the forge and is 20 feet away but bordering a flat line, you can break to heal yourself and attribute 100% of that effect to him. For that, it proves helpful to mark the tank with a vibrant raid mark so you can easily tell if he/she is in your LOS; the healing percent doesn’t apply if they aren’t. Tip to all: If you stack your debuff to 20+, you shouldn’t expect to stay alive.

Patchwerk in Naxxramas

Typically, as a healadin, you will find yourself assigned to heal a tank during this fight (or any fight for that matter).  When tank healing Patchwerk, it may be helpful to beacon the opposite tank of the one you are assigned to heal.  The reason for this is that in this fight, you are not healing anyone that isn’t your tank. Given this situation, your target will not benefit from Beacon heals.

Emalon in Vault of Archavon

I’ve seen Beacons used a variety of ways in this fight.  This is an adaptive placement fight so knowing where your tanks are in correlation to you is very important.  Occasionally, the tanks will bring the adds so far away from each other that it is impossible to heal both in emergencies.  If you are on the MT, your beacon is the only thing that can and will reach your far-out-there OT.  If you notice that his healers aren’t keeping the appropriate pace and he constantly taunts death, it is considerably efficient to Beacon him. However, if you are that far apart but your Beacon heals are just dumping into overheal, at this time you may find it helpful to Beacon yourself. Why? It seems that no matter where you go, if lighting nova doesn’t find you…chain lightening will. You should know to stand 10 yards from anyone…they probably don’t however and you are going to get slammed. Therefore, while never taking your aim from the tank you’re topped off again. It is also important to note, that in some occasions, raid healers think other healers should take care of themselves. I know, I know….

I hope that this small insight into successful Beacon use helps anyone and everyone.  I’ve been through a lot with its use from people telling me who to Beacon to other holy paladins thinking they are better than me.  But sometimes, you have to do what is right for your healing style, catastrophe could be waiting if you don’t.



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Filed under 5-Man & Raids, Healing Tips, Holy Paladin